Monday, January 04, 2010

Not your resolution, your story.

I recently finished Donald Miller's new book, A Million Miles in a Thousand Years, and as soon as I finished the last page, I promptly turned back to the beginning and started over again. Yes, it's that good. And that transformative.

I've never been a fan of New Year's resolutions, but, here's something I can run with. It's a blog post written by Donald Miller where he explains how improving your life story might be a better idea than setting goals that have no real context. This whole idea of improving your "story" builds on what he wrote in A Million Miles. Even if you haven't read the book (yet), you should check out his post. It will give you a whole new (and healthier) perspective on resolutions.

Edited to add: Today, Miller wrote a second post with some ideas for how to create more memorable scenes in order to live a better story. I love this idea and have been trying to do it more often and have, at times, made a fool of myself. But my children will remember those scenes fondly!

5 comments:

Fulton said...

i read the first blog post, and as you know im a huge fan of resolutions. but i really liked his perspective. So instead of my goal being to lose 26 pounds, im going to instead make it my goal to sit in Wild Wing Cafe, order 25 wings, a basket of big fat fries, a coke, and weighing a measily 170 pounds. :)

Fulton said...

i meant to say beer, not coke. if i ordered a coke, that'd ruin another story of mine =P.

Hillary Dickman said...
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Hillary Dickman said...
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Hillary Dickman said...

Sorry...I left several ugly typos up there and couldn't stand to see them on my blog. Let me try again...


Nice, Michael.

Your resolutions are usually within a story, you just don't necessarily frame them that way. The half marathon, the selling woodwork...it could just be "I want to run 13 miles in two hours," but instead it's the goal of the marathon which makes it a bigger part of your life and, once you've signed up for the marathon, a commitment you can't really back down from. And you could just be making woodwork to keep to yourself, but by selling it, you're combining your story with someone else's and putting yourself out there for your work to be either admired or not.

I'm always amazed at what a great job you do with resolutions. I think I'm just too scared of failure to make them for myself.